Well, lip-service is a big part of it, actually. Active lip-service?  You’ll see.

I’ve spoken before about how to support authors — reviews are key, maybe even more than just you buying a copy of their book, and WHERE you should put your reviews — but I read another writer’s post that goes into the serious nitty-gritty of the publishing world, and it just hits home so much harder.

book reviews authors readers

Guys, we’re not making a lot of money here*. If your name isn’t something like Rowling (or Kardashian or King), you’re making a small percentage of a few hundred (or hopefully a few thousand) sales. If that’s a 10,000 print first run–pretty decent for a standard Big Name publishing contract–and you sell out in a year, that author made $20,000! …before taxes. That becomes $16,000. For the year. Those are poverty level wages in the USA, if not accompanied by any other income.

Keep in mind that I just posited a Big Name publishing contract. When you talk about smaller presses, you’re in the 1000 printed copies for a first run range. Big difference, huh? Hey. It’s a business. It’s how it works.  (This doesn’t include eBooks, but the number of sales and the percentages are the same.)

What tips all of this over into a livable wage (which, anyone who writes would love to make their living writing stories. That’s the dream! Most of us have second jobs.), is when more people beyond our small social media scope begin to read our books, either through a purchase at a bookstore, online, or through a library.

writers block typewriter LGBT

 

But how do other people HEAR about such and such author? From you.

From the article by Kristen Lamb:

Reviews are more important now than ever before, especially for the indie and self-published author. The reason is that with the change in the publishing paradigm, the slush pile (unfortunately) has been dumped into the reader’s lap. There are a lot of bad books out there. But even then, that really isn’t all that big of a problem.

With the Internet and social media and the explosion of books there is SO MUCH content. This means consumers are overwhelmed with choices. Reviews help writers sell books because if readers see a book with no reviews or five reviews versus a similar title with thirty reviews? Who will they choose?

Instead of sending me an e-mail about how much my book changed your life? Put it on Amazon and change MINE! 

Readers are essential to our success beyond just the sale. If you love our books, your promotion means a thousand times more than any ad I could pay for. Ads and marketing don’t sell books. Never did and never will. Only thing that sells books is word of mouth.

I don’t want to sound ungrateful for those private messages I’ve gotten about how much you’ve enjoyed my books. I am so, so grateful for them. I keep them safe and warm and pull them out on days when I think about giving up (something that happens a lot, to be frank).

But you know what really helps? What makes me feel like maybe I can do this, maybe I can put another story out there, maybe work a little harder at this whole “being a professional writer” thing? When I see reviews out in public.

book reviews readers share

Who doesn’t love knowing that people are willing to stand by you publicly? Privately is nice, but publicly legitimizes your work in such a magnificent way. It not only means so much emotionally, but it means a lot to the bottom line, and that, my friends, is what will enable your favorite authors to continue to give you stories you love.

The sad truth is that until a book gets at least 50 reviews on Amazon, Amazon won’t advertise that particular book. But once you hit that magic number? They start promoting the hell out of it. You know when your Kindle goes into the home screen? That’s a big one.  Or when you buy a book and they do the whole “people who bought that liked” thing?  Oh, yeah. Or when you click onto Amazon and they have a book title as the banner?  [salivates and makes ungentlemanly noises]

That means more exposure for an Indie author, which means more likelihood that they’ll be able to give you more stories.

writing books typewriter vintage

It’s a symbiotic relationship. We need each other to keep this beautiful, crazy cycle going. Your reviews are crucial. They can literally make or break a book.

Reblogging and liking posts on Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook is awesome. Even more awesome is going to a place like Amazon and sharing your thoughts. Talking about books you love to the general public is how people decide what to read. It’s been shown that people tend to buy books based off of trusted reviews from people they know/follow.

So you guys sharing your favorite books with the public at large? Yeah, that’s the stuff. <3

*and this doesn’t even go into the serious damage that pirated books cause. Yeah, I know, we all hate how Lars from Metallica and Taylor Swift were griping about losing money from their stuff being pirated, but those are multi-millionaires with multiple revenue streams. Authors are hundredaires. You pirate their books, and you’re seriously harming their careers to the point where they can’t afford to keep writing you books. See the difference?

Sharing is caring: