Laura Stone

Writer, Fangirl, Nacho Lover

Category: Writing Wednesdays (page 1 of 3)

Full heart, great books, can’t lose

I was delighted to find my book, AND IT CAME TO PASS, on a list of the best of 2017–the best 17 of 2017–list of romances on USA TODAY‘s book review website, Happily Ever After.

A tremendous list to share company with! See sidebar for buy links, and don’t forget to ask your library for a copy!

LGBT Mormon Missionary Award

 

Sharing is caring:

Representation Matters

[Edited to add new data]: It pains me to have to repost this article given new statistics, but a segment of our country–one in which my children and I belong–is in crisis. It’s so important to add positivity, to add love and kindness and understanding to the world. If you’re new to the world of LGBT literature, I hope you’ll come to learn how important it is for our queer brothers and sisters to just be given the space to be, the space to breathe and live and hope and dream. Denying them this space is literally killing them. We can do better.

As I have loved you, love one another.”

LGBT LDS Mormon Temple

 

A stranger I met at the airport insisted her husband drive me to my hotel instead of catching a cab. If this had happened anywhere but in Utah, that would be the start of a horror movie. But in Utah, smiles and help are freely given. These new friends were excited to hear about my purpose for traveling: I was a panelist at what was previously called Salt Lake City Comic Con, the second largest of its kind in the country. They were particularly excited by the subject matter of my panel: On-the-page queer representation in literature.

Oh, I should probably mention they weren’t Mormon, or rather members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They were Mormon-adjacent.

For all the good that the Mormon Church does, and they do some outstanding service work and foster a mindset of helping one another, for all those smiles and wholesome pictures of family togetherness that they love to put on billboards and into TV commercials, there’s a dark underbelly that’s of the Church’s own making.

The leading cause of death among Utah teens is suicide.

Not cancer, heart disease, car wrecks or anything else. In fact, Utah teens kill themselves at a rate of four times the national average as of this printing. It’s estimated that forty percent of them are known to be LGBTQ youth, but that number is likely much higher due to a real fear of “coming out” and parents erasing their child’s orientation post-mortem to save face.

In November of 2015, the Mormon Church delivered a Proclamation, an act akin to an Amendment of the Constitution in that the statement becomes Doctrinal Law. They stated that LGB members either cannot ever act on their orientation or they cannot be members. (They completely denounce people who are transgender and forbid gender-confirmation surgery. They also use the term “same-sex attracted”, or SSA to replace LGBTQ because they’re so antiquated they don’t realize sexuality and gender are two separate issues.)

If the LGB/SSA person has already acted on that “feeling” by entering into a committed queer relationship, their children will be denied baptism (membership with all the perks that come with it, such as eternal glory) until they in turn become adults and renounce their parents. For some folks, this became a non-issue. They simply wouldn’t be members.

But Mormonism isn’t just about where you go on Sunday. Mormonism is a culture, particularly in Utah. Mormonism influences everything from who your children play with, who you do business with and in many cases, how successful those businesses are, and it dictates all of your social activities. It’s a 24/7 lifestyle. Sunday is the breather! There’s even a hymn taught to kids, “Saturday is a special day/it’s the day we get ready for Sunday” and then it lists all the tasks you must do to be prepared for Sunday’s three-hour meeting.

Everything about Mormonism centers on the family. You pray together, you play together, you live for ever and ever together. Well, unless you’re an active queer person; then you don’t get to be with your family for ever and ever. (For some of us, that might be a blessing!) But for a devout Mormon, queer or otherwise, that’s a terrifying, isolating thought. Your family is your world. And then they’re…gone. And it’s all your fault.

After this Proclamation, there was a horrifying rash of suicide, both amongst teen Mormons and adults. The despair was real. The hurt and rejection palpable. Those numbers aren’t going down.

The world may have moved on to at least recognize same-sex marriage, but in Utah, time seems to stand still. It’s only been a few decades since there were electroshock treatments at BYU to “cure” people of their “homosexual-tendencies”. The Church pressures its members to utilize Church-owned or Church-approved materials. They create their own magazines, publish books, create movies, and provide family entertainment, so why look elsewhere? And it’s not always easy to find materials outside these religion-sanctioned sources for “prayerful study” to understand why you might feel the way you do about yourself.

teen LGBT worry anxiety

Imagine being a kid, around 14 or 15, and you’re questioning either your sexuality or gender. Perhaps you have a “family computer” in the main room, a tactic the Church recommends for morality-policing, so it’s not like you can just Google, “Am I gay?” You can’t drive, so you’re reliant on your parents or a family member to get you places. If you’re in Salt Lake, maybe you go to the mall, but the good mall is owned by the LDS Church—a building where visible tattoos mean you’re escorted from the premises. The bookstores aren’t going to have anything that contradicts the Church’s teachings, so that’s out. Maybe you go to the library. Do you dare venture into the LGBTQ section (that is, if that library has such a thing) to look for information? Do you ask the librarian? What if she goes to your same church and knows your family? You’ve just outed yourself before you even started understanding who you are.

This past June I attended the American Library Association’s convention on behalf of my publisher, Interlude Press, a publication house of queer-focused literature. I learned that this was a real issue for many librarians, who are often the forerunners of connecting queer youth with materials to help educate. Add in religious control, be it direct or perceived, and you have a potentially dangerous situation.

In Utah, this is just what it’s become.

I settled into my seat on the dais at SLCC and looked out on a decently-sized room, roughly two-thirds filled. This is a Comic Con, so a lot of people were in costumes. There were also folks in work-day clothes, nervously taking seats in the back. As the panel began, more people slipped inside, forced to move closer to the front for available seats. Then it was time to introduce myself.

“Hi! I’m Laura Stone, I’m from Lehi with family all over the Valley, and I couldn’t come out as queer until my late 30s. I’m no longer an active Mormon, and all three of my kids are LGBT.” (I know. I’m really lucky.)

The gasp and delighted shock on people’s faces is something I’ll never forget. That was also the first time I’ve ever outed myself in public, and it was the first time I felt safe to do so, which is ironic, given my living experiences up to that point kept me in the closet.

The panel was a huge success, very interactive, and later, I must have stood outside the room for a half hour just witnessing other people’s joy as they told me their stories. All weekend I manned my publisher’s booth, a house that specializes in high-quality queer literature with queer protagonists. If I was still Mormon, I would have likened this experience to Testimony Meeting.

A darling girl, around twenty, came by nervously asking me what our books were about. After giving her the rundown on a few genres, she stopped me with tears welling up in her eyes. “You mean no one dies in these books?” I threw my arms around her as she started crying, rocking her side to side and rubbing her back. “No. No, everyone lives. They get to just live.

She confessed to me in a broken whisper that she’d wanted to die. I held her tighter and made sure she knew that if she ever felt that way again, she better call me, that we’d talk on the phone until she didn’t feel that way anymore.

I met former missionaries, former temple workers, all who had either tentatively put a foot out of the closet, or had stomped out in a fabulous pair of shoes, daring anyone to challenge them. There was the gay couple who were married in spirit and the lesbian couple who had it legitimized in a court of law. There were lots of happy-faced lesbians and bisexuals who had their family’s support (or who didn’t care if they had it), and nervous gay and trans boys who couldn’t bring themselves to tell their parents. I heard all of these stories, and this was just on the first day of a three day convention.

Two other girls, dressed like Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure, stopped by several times throughout the Con for hugs and more book recommendations. One great kid with a camera and a manuscript stopped by every morning to be reassured that even though he was straight, it was okay for him to write books that feature queer people. One of our authors is a transman. A blue-haired boy I remembered from the panel’s audience visited him every day, eyes bright and happy to see someone who was just like him. They talked about top-surgery, coming out to parents, and life in general. This boy got to see that not only are there others just like him, but they’re living and thriving. They’re writing stories about characters who live and thrive, too.

Interlude Press LGBT publishing

 

Our booth became a safe space for a severely marginalized group of people. The teens and early twenty-somethings who visited us daily needed to see that there are books about them in the world, positive stories that aren’t necessarily about coming out or the trauma of being queer. With Interlude Press there are action-adventure stories that just happen to feature a bisexual Chinese-American (Not Your Sidekick). We have an historical western with a gay Mexican rancher written as an homage to Pride & Prejudice. We have romance, historical, science fiction, YA, high fantasy and literary fiction, and they all have positive queer role models.

My latest novel was titled specifically to signal to queer Mormons: And It Came To Pass. The cover features two obvious LDS missionaries with their hands surreptitiously linked. It follows Adam Young, a devout Mormon on his mission as he realizes that he’s gay. While there is a romantic element to the book, it’s more about a person discovering themselves and what they really believe and how that aligns with a faith that doesn’t accept them. Devout Mormons who happen to be queer have been left by the wayside. I wanted to write a story for them. For us, really, although I no longer actively participate in the Church.

I wanted to write a story for those who believe fervently in a god yet are raised in religions that claim God doesn’t want them.

Initially I wrote the book for a beloved cousin, who did not get a happy ending and quite frankly, whose overbearing, devoutly Mormon father was quoted almost word-for-word in the book. I wrote the happy ending I wished for him. As I’m writing this, I’ve just learned of another Utah suicide, another queer teen who felt hopeless and abandoned. It breaks my heart. I want all of these beautiful, loving, big-hearted people I met to have a happy, or least a hopeful story.

And of my darling, special girl who, with lip trembling and gorgeous, tear-filled doe-eyes whispered that she’d wanted to die? She came to see me every day, too, and got a hug from me every single time. By the third day, she was visibly stronger. She didn’t creep up to the booth, worried she’d interrupt us. I got an excited wave and a bone-squeezing hug, although that may have been from my end. I beamed as she told me about telling her Mormon dad she was a lesbian and how he took it in stride. More importantly, he told her he still loved her and would choose her, always.

One week out from the convention, she sent me a private message through social media. She came out to her whole family. In her words, she was having the most “queer and wonderful” week of her life, and it was just time. Emboldened by visibility and empowered by acceptance, she made the leap out of the closet. The sheer relief and joy she felt as a result came through her rapid-fire messages detailing the experience.

There has to be visibility. There has to be a point where the literary world embraces stories with queer protagonists, and not only the story of trauma and suffering that allows straight people to empathize with us. We need the story where the detective solves the crime, and she happens to be a lesbian with a wife waiting for her at home. We need a story where the adventurer is trans and defeats the evil corporation robbing crypts of their spoils. We need a gay boxer and lesbian scientist and bisexual grocery store clerks who can also see the supernatural. People need to see themselves in media or they buy into the idea that they’re disposable.

LGBT families youth suicide

These kids, young adults, and disaffected adults matter. These stories matter. Our presence in the world of literature matters. We can do better. We must. Lives are on the line.

Sharing is caring:

My Grandmother’s Secret

It’s hard to keep a secret in a small town.

Even harder is keeping a secret in a deeply religious town where everyone keeps moral tabs on each other, and often under the direction of their religious leaders.

My grandparents had a huge farm in a small mountain town, Lehi, Utah. My father’s high school class of 1965 had eighty-six kids. When I lived with my grandmother during college, there were about 7,000 people in the whole town. Small. Everyone knew everyone else. Lehi is also deeply Mormon. It’s just up the Wasatch front from Provo, Utah, home to BYU and the Missionary Training Center.

Lehi Utah Mormon LGBT

“Now I gotta cut loose! Footloose!” Lehi’s claim to fame

 

For those unfamiliar, when you’re an active member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, it’s more than just attending Sunday meetings with your neighbors. You have morning Seminary for teens, daily Institute if you’re in college, Home Teaching, Visiting Teaching, Relief Society, Sunday night Firesides, Monday night Family Home Evening activities, youth activities on Wednesdays, and of course, Sunday service, which is three hours long.

It’s a lifestyle. Mormons prefer mingling with other Mormons, so you’re usually in each other’s pockets, especially in a small community like Lehi.

Secrets aren’t easy to keep.

In the early ’90s, my grandmother had a stroke, and I moved in to care of her. Those were some of the best months of my life, even though they were tinged with the knowledge that her time was coming to an end. I got to know her in a way most people never do with a grandparent.

She’d grown up the middle sister, her older sister a wildly dynamic and popular young lady. In her 20s, she developed a skin-disease–neurofibromas, raised tumors over her face and body. It always left her feeling like the ugly duckling, leaving her ashamed to be out in public. She’d been the second wife to an older husband who spoke lovingly of his first wife. Due to a “quirk” in the Mormon faith, her husband was still “sealed” for time and all eternity to this first wife, which meant that my grandma would share her husband with his first wife, Florence, forever. Mormons don’t believe in “until death do you part”.

She’d become the caregiver for a rapidly declining husband thirty years her senior while taking over as the main breadwinner for our sprawling family. And through all of this, she always honored her church callings. She never failed to miss a meeting, visit the sick, or feed the hungry.

After her stroke, she was just tired. She wanted to be left alone and didn’t care for what felt like false sympathy from the neighbors she’d known for decades, able to see the performance for what it was. Instead of entertaining visitors, my job was to turn people away with kindness and help carry her to her Big Chair where she would read.

And this is when I learned of her secret. Continue reading

Sharing is caring:

Please take a moment to consider our LGBTQ brothers and sisters in Chechnya

If you have somehow missed the horrorshow that is the current climate in Chechnya, gay and bisexual men (in particular, but I fear this is just the start) are being rounded up, tortured and killed for the simple fact that they are not straight.

This is terrifying. This is also unacceptable. Several writers and publishers of LGBT literature have decided to do something to raise money and awareness for this dreadful situation.

BOOKS SAVE LIVES

There’s no question that access to information is life-changing. But also as important (and something many don’t consider) is the fact that just seeing yourself represented can be life-changing. In some cases, it can save a person’s life.

We’re taking that idea and raising money to help our queer friends in Chechnya as best as we can. David Lowery is hosting a fundraiser and charity auction from May 5 – 12th, whose proceeds will benefit vetted LGBT charities for Russians under attack. I’ll be donating 3 signed copies of my books.

Please follow the link to see all of the amazing authors donating books and services and see how you can help our community.

Sharing is caring:

Reader’s Question: no guns?

From Perryavenue on Tumblr:

Why didn’t Renaldo and Hank carry guns with them for protection? Eduardo had a gun when he was at his parents’ home, wouldn’t Renaldo and Hank carry guns when they’re traveling along open and rough terrain with potential predators (both animal and human)?

Fun (and probably shocking) fact, most cowboys didn’t carry guns! Turns out that’s a Hollywood fabrication. Guns were expensive, hard to maintain, and cumbersome as a guy on a horse. Six shooters? Super pricey. You had a rifle if you were a frontiersman (bear, wolves), and you had a handgun if you were a man of the law, but cowboys? They were the bottom of the barrel.

I cannot stress enough how low on the totem pole cowboys were at this time.  Cowboy = guy who literally rode next to or behind a herd of cattle on a cattle drive for very little pay.  They didn’t have the funds or need for such hardware. It was considered a dangerous practice to carry a pistol, and wasn’t something that was looked upon with positivity. (Not to mention that handguns were considered a luxury item.)

A dispatch from the Texas Live Stock Journal dated June 5, 1884, 14 years after Bitter Springs is set:

The six-shooter loaded with deadly cartridges is a dangerous companion for any man, especially if he should unfortunately be primed with whiskey. Cattlemen should unite in aiding the enforcement of the law against carrying of deadly weapons.” 

Continue reading

Sharing is caring:

Used Bookstores – When Authors “Lose” Money But Gain Readers

Salon had an article recently addressing the post Kristen Lamb posted (that I also referenced) about used bookstores, their effect on authors (short story: authors don’t see a dime from the sale of their book in them), and how that can have long-term implications to an author’s livelihood.

Lisa writing is hard

…not so fast. The long-term implications aren’t dire. I touched on this before and stand by that post. For those who might be click averse, the point in that second post is that getting readers is what really matters.

Someone having a copy of your book–from a library, a used bookstore, borrowed from a friend–means that someone has a copy of your book!  As a writer, you put a lot of blood, sweat and tears into those pages, and you just want someone to read it. Even better if they like it. (Gold medal if they love it, but hey, fair-to-middling emotions are just fine, too.)

From the Salon.com article:

“Used bookstores are not the end point to a reader’s journey, but often the starting point, not to mention that they are often treasure troves of out-of-print books, many of which might not exist in e-book or audiobook form.”

We readers (especially voracious readers) typically find an author we enjoy and the buy or check out of a library every book they have. When you find a writer whose style clicks with your way of reading, man, that’s the stuff. Once that book is done, you’re ready for the next one. Who cares how you find that author! Half Price Books led me to so many beloved authors, authors whose books I bought for myself, new, and still have on my shelf.

LGBT books reading animation

Sometimes I wasn’t sure if I’d like a writer’s style, so buying a partially beat up, dog-eared copy at HPB seemed less expensive of a gamble. And when it turned out that I really enjoyed it? Off to the “proper” bookstore to get my hands on everything. Sometimes. Sometimes I didn’t have the funds to get brand new, so if the library didn’t have a copy (or I didn’t want to wait for my turn to come around), I’d grab another battered copy from HPB.

To me, what’s important is that people are reading. Because if you as a writer can hook a reader, you’ll have a reader for life. I mean, it’s like the drug dealing analogy: you get them on the comeback. 😉

It’s important to remember that while yes, selling books is a business (and it’s not profitable unless you’re at the top, either in sales–your Stephen Kings, etc–or by being a big muckity-muck in the publishing world) it’s also an art. Art is meant to be shared. Books are meant to be read.

So let the readers read.

(And then readers? Reviews, mentions on social media, and shoving a copy in a friend’s hand and pointing at the words are about the best PR an author can get. We love you for it.)

Sharing is caring:

Going beyond lip-service. How to really support authors you love.

Well, lip-service is a big part of it, actually. Active lip-service?  You’ll see.

I’ve spoken before about how to support authors — reviews are key, maybe even more than just you buying a copy of their book, and WHERE you should put your reviews — but I read another writer’s post that goes into the serious nitty-gritty of the publishing world, and it just hits home so much harder.

book reviews authors readers

Guys, we’re not making a lot of money here*. If your name isn’t something like Rowling (or Kardashian or King), you’re making a small percentage of a few hundred (or hopefully a few thousand) sales. If that’s a 10,000 print first run–pretty decent for a standard Big Name publishing contract–and you sell out in a year, that author made $20,000! …before taxes. That becomes $16,000. For the year. Those are poverty level wages in the USA, if not accompanied by any other income.

Keep in mind that I just posited a Big Name publishing contract. When you talk about smaller presses, you’re in the 1000 printed copies for a first run range. Big difference, huh? Hey. It’s a business. It’s how it works.  (This doesn’t include eBooks, but the number of sales and the percentages are the same.)

What tips all of this over into a livable wage (which, anyone who writes would love to make their living writing stories. That’s the dream! Most of us have second jobs.), is when more people beyond our small social media scope begin to read our books, either through a purchase at a bookstore, online, or through a library.

writers block typewriter LGBT

 

But how do other people HEAR about such and such author? From you.

From the article by Kristen Lamb:

Reviews are more important now than ever before, especially for the indie and self-published author. The reason is that with the change in the publishing paradigm, the slush pile (unfortunately) has been dumped into the reader’s lap. There are a lot of bad books out there. But even then, that really isn’t all that big of a problem.

With the Internet and social media and the explosion of books there is SO MUCH content. This means consumers are overwhelmed with choices. Reviews help writers sell books because if readers see a book with no reviews or five reviews versus a similar title with thirty reviews? Who will they choose?

Instead of sending me an e-mail about how much my book changed your life? Put it on Amazon and change MINE! 

Readers are essential to our success beyond just the sale. If you love our books, your promotion means a thousand times more than any ad I could pay for. Ads and marketing don’t sell books. Never did and never will. Only thing that sells books is word of mouth.

I don’t want to sound ungrateful for those private messages I’ve gotten about how much you’ve enjoyed my books. I am so, so grateful for them. I keep them safe and warm and pull them out on days when I think about giving up (something that happens a lot, to be frank).

But you know what really helps? What makes me feel like maybe I can do this, maybe I can put another story out there, maybe work a little harder at this whole “being a professional writer” thing? When I see reviews out in public.

book reviews readers share

Who doesn’t love knowing that people are willing to stand by you publicly? Privately is nice, but publicly legitimizes your work in such a magnificent way. It not only means so much emotionally, but it means a lot to the bottom line, and that, my friends, is what will enable your favorite authors to continue to give you stories you love.

The sad truth is that until a book gets at least 50 reviews on Amazon, Amazon won’t advertise that particular book. But once you hit that magic number? They start promoting the hell out of it. You know when your Kindle goes into the home screen? That’s a big one.  Or when you buy a book and they do the whole “people who bought that liked” thing?  Oh, yeah. Or when you click onto Amazon and they have a book title as the banner?  [salivates and makes ungentlemanly noises]

That means more exposure for an Indie author, which means more likelihood that they’ll be able to give you more stories.

writing books typewriter vintage

It’s a symbiotic relationship. We need each other to keep this beautiful, crazy cycle going. Your reviews are crucial. They can literally make or break a book.

Reblogging and liking posts on Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook is awesome. Even more awesome is going to a place like Amazon and sharing your thoughts. Talking about books you love to the general public is how people decide what to read. It’s been shown that people tend to buy books based off of trusted reviews from people they know/follow.

So you guys sharing your favorite books with the public at large? Yeah, that’s the stuff. <3

*and this doesn’t even go into the serious damage that pirated books cause. Yeah, I know, we all hate how Lars from Metallica and Taylor Swift were griping about losing money from their stuff being pirated, but those are multi-millionaires with multiple revenue streams. Authors are hundredaires. You pirate their books, and you’re seriously harming their careers to the point where they can’t afford to keep writing you books. See the difference?

Sharing is caring:

The Birth of a Notion

One question I’ve often been asked (and I love it!) is,  “Where do the ideas for your stories come from? What’s the kernel? The 4-1-1, as the kids say (if the kids are 33).” For Bitter Springs, I stumbled across something that led me to months of research into actual LGBT history and a proper education of our past, and not the straight-washed “everyone was murderered if they were even kind of homo back in the day” mindset most people hold.

First off, that’s not even how you spell it. Second, it is my utter delight to show all the ways in which that mindset is incorrect, this idea – that every single LGBT person was shunned, that they were hidden away inside attics and broken down sheds at the edge of their family’s farms*,  or basically forced to live their lives in misery until dying from their ‘gayness’, not unlike consumption**. Turns out, that’s not true. LGBT people lived long, happy lives with their partners, and often. Not everyone did, religion always messes things up, but enough folks did to make it a Real Thing.

Gay cowboys gunslingers Tombstone

I’d like you to meet, as I call them, “The Fellas.” Bobby Jackson, Frank Hart. Boothill Cemetery, Tombstone, AZ

*Let’s not act like the whole attic thing isn’t a completely rich, white straight thing for illegitimate children born on soap operas. Because that’s what that is. Yes, I grew up on All My Children and Days of our Lives, why do you ask?

** I use “gay” as a catch-all term to encompass the many beautiful and varied colors of the LGBTQIA rainbow because we still have a long, long way to go

But back to these gay gunslingers who couldn’t bear to be separated even in death… Continue reading

Sharing is caring:

19th Century Mexican Feminists You Should Know

My upcoming novel BITTER SPRINGS is set in 1870′s San Felipe Del Rio (Del Rio, TX it’s called now), and it follows Renaldo Valle Santos (I use Spanish naming protocol, in which the mother’s surname is added after the paternal family name). Renaldo has a twin sister Calandaría, and she’s a bit of a spitfire. And by a bit I mean a lot. And it’s on purpose, and it’s not anachronistic.

In the latter half of the 19th Century in Mexico, revolution was brewing. Within the past hundred years, they’d already won their independence from Spain, fought nasty, long battles with Texicans (Tejanos were people who separated from Mexico in that they lived in Texas, the ‘border lands/buffer zone’ that Spain established, didn’t want to become American, didn’t necessarily want to be Mexican even though that and the Native Americans of the region were their heritage; they just wanted to be left alone), and some nasty battles with America–still ongoing.

 

Mexican feminists Nineteenth Century,Mexican feminist radicals

Dolores Jiménez y Muro, 19th Century Mexican Feminist and all around awesome person of whom you should know.

Some of the most important Mexican feminists in history were born at this time, and man, they kicked butt. Continue reading

Sharing is caring:

Why Should Writers Love Libraries?

librarian in library,libraries

This is the face of someone who wants you to find the right book.

Here’s a wild tidbit for you, there are more libraries in the United States than there are world-wide McDonald’s restaurants. (The American Library Association says that there are 119,487 of them, and there are 35,000 Micky Ds in the world.) Here’s an even wilder fact for your face: library book sales don’t count towards your book’s ranking in those ever important BestSeller lists.  Isn’t that… weird? I think it’s weird, but then, the NYT didn’t ask me, so there you go.

So you have an author wanting to build and maintain a career, and that means selling books, and anyone buying a book is a saint. This also means building a reputation as someone who produces an excellent product–that’s how you make your money, on the come back.

Which brings us back to the library. Let’s say your local library is super awesome and buys four–four!!–copies of your latest book. They’re going to keep that on the shelf for years, and hundreds (I’m being optimistic) of people are going to read it!

…those originally purchased four books. Welp, that’s a loss.

NO. IT ISN’T. And this is why we’re here: libraries are amazing sources for authors. You should love and thank every dang library that buys your book, and I’ll tell you why: Continue reading

Sharing is caring:
Older posts

© 2018 Laura Stone

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑

Plugin from the creators ofBrindes :: More at PlulzWordpress Plugins